Monthly Archives: August 2017

So ever get this question ” you don’t look autistic?”

So ever get bumped into this question You don’t look Autistic? People still today have little to a lack of education on Autism and functioning labels!!! Here is how to measure out the ways on the right vs. the wrong way to label high or low functioning!!!!

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And again I have to post this cause people don’t get it!!!

Autism and Neurodiversity Movement GlossaryAutism and Neurodiversity Movement Glossary:

A

AAC-

Acultural- Don’t fit with the dominant social

Ableism- Discrimination against disabled ( including neurodivergent people ) people.

ADOS- Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule  

Alexithymia- Difficulty understanding and identifying your emotions and those of others

Allistic/Allist- Non autistic descriptor/person

Asperger’s- Verbal, non-intellectually disabled autism. Not usually synonymous with a functioning label.

Aspie- Diminutive of an asperger person ( see asperger’s ).

Apraxia/Verbal Dyspraxia- Difficulty speaking/learning to speak relating to movement.

Auditory Processing Difficulty- Difficulty understanding speech or difficulty understanding speech quickly.  

Autistic culture- A phrase often used on the autistic community to refer the differences of autists and the things that autistic people create

Autistic spectrum- The fact that all autistic people are different and autism varies widely from person to person in terms of differences, difficulties and strengths.

Autism Rights Movement (ARM)- Movement promoting various values ( see link )

Amy Sequenzia- Non-speaking ARM advocate and member of ASAN. Her blog: http://nonspeakingautisticspeaking.blogspot.co.uk/

B

Burnout- Autists burnout more easily compared to allists

C

Cross lateral- Being opposite footed and handed is more common in neurodivergent people

Cure Culture- The medical model assumption that all neurological ( and physical ) differences should be cured and words used affiliated with this ideology

D

Double Vision- Is more common in Autists according to SPD Australia

Dyscalculia- Specific difficulties with maths

Dyspraxia- Difficulty with planning of movement, balance, eye-teaming and hand-eye coordination

Dysgraphia- Specific difficulties with writing

Dyssemia- Difficulty reading body language and facial expressions, usually associated with autism

Dyslexia- Different way of processing words that causes difficulties with reading

E

Echolalia

Executive functioning- A series of cognitive skills used for everyday tasks autists have both strengths, differences and difficulties in this area. Musing of An Aspie post/s on executive functioning difficulties: https://musingsofanaspie.com/executive-function-series/  

Eye Teaming-

F

Facilitated communication-

Functioning labels- Includes labels like “low”/”high” functioning and severity labels, these generally avoided in the autistic community because they are inaccurate and unhelp, causing people to make assumptions about a person that are not true. It’s also often difficult to classify someone as one or the because just like allists, autists have different skill levels in different areas (e.g.: They may be highly verbal but not able to cross a road without support ) and our “ functioning” fluctuates from day to day.  

G
H

Hand-eye coordination

Hand flapping

Hyperfocus

Hypotonia- Low muscle tone, common in autistic and dyspraxic people

I

Identity-first language

Inertia

Intense World Theory
J

K

L

M

Medical Model of Disability

Meltdown

Monotropism

Motor skills

MMS

Multiply Neurodivergent

Multisensory Approach

N

Neurocosmopolitanism

Neurodivergent

Neurodiverse

Neurodiversity

Neurodiversity Model

Neurodiversity Movement

Neurodiversity Paradigm

Neurominority

Neuronative

Neuronormative

Neurotypical

Neurotypical Privilege  

Neuroqueer

O

P

Packing

PDA

Partially verbal

Passing

PECS

Perfectionism

Person-first language

Prosopagnosia

Q
R
S

Shutdown

Sensory differences  

Sensory profile

Sensory seeking

Social Model of Disability

Stimming

Special interests

Spoons/spoon theory

Synesthesia

T
U
V
W

Wrist flapping
X
Y
Z

Zoning out

You say acceptance but still walk on tolerance towards autistics

Mission statement 

Autism Speaks is dedicated to promoting solutions, across the spectrum and throughout the lifespan, for the needs of individuals with autism and their families through advocacy and support; increasing understanding and acceptance of people with autism spectrum disorder; and advancing research into causes and better interventions for autism spectrum disorder and related conditions. 

Autism Speaks enhances lives today and is accelerating a spectrum of solutions for tomorrow.

Umm 😐 more like tolerance to me than acceptance so fuck you!!!!

Difference ? 

What does Acceptance mean?
The word acceptance is used in the sense of ‘approval’ or ‘receipt’. Take a look at the following sentences.
The word of acceptance thrilled Francis.
He nodded his head with acceptance.
In both the sentences, the word acceptance is used in the sense of ‘approval.’ Hence, the meaning of the first sentence would be ‘the word of approval thrilled Francis’ and the meaning of the second sentence would be ‘he nodded his head with approval.’
According to the Oxford English dictionary, acceptance is ‘the action of consenting to receive or undertake something offered.’

What does Tolerance mean?
On the other hand, the word tolerance is used in the sense of ‘forbearance’ or ‘patience.’ Bearing that in mind, observe the two sentences given below.
Tolerance of all religions was practiced by the Emperor.
Lucy imbibed the quality of tolerance from her childhood.
In both the sentences, you can see that the word tolerance is used in the sense of ‘forbearance’. As a result, you can take the meaning of the first sentence as follows, ‘the Emperor practiced the idea that all religions should be accepted with patience.’ The meaning of the second sentence could be taken as ‘Lucy imbibed the quality of forbearance (patient self-control) from her childhood.’
It is important to note that the word tolerance is used in the formation of words such as ‘universal tolerance’ and ‘religious tolerance’.

It will be easy for you to understand tolerance if it is put as this. According to the Oxford English dictionary, tolerance is ‘the ability or willingness to tolerate the existence of opinions or behaviour that one dislikes or disagrees with.

So , stop walking in tolerance and let’s have acceptance